Thursday, June 10, 2010

Flatiron Building, Wellington Street Toronto

18x18
Oil on Canvas
This building is Toronto's "Flatiron Building", similar to the examples of this style in New York and Atlanta. It forms a wedge shape at the corner of Wellington and Front Streets. Its color stands out in an area of light  high rises. It was a challenge to make it fit in. I actually waited for the turquoise taxi  (a common sight in Toronto) to show up and snapped a few photos. I thought it would balance nicely with the turret color.
I have been having a look at Richard Schmid's  book and decided to try two colors he uses. Viridian and Terra Rosa. Mixed with other colors, one can make some amazing grays. For the background buildings, I used Terra Rosa with cobalt blue and white. Also, viridian and alizarin crimson makes a nice dark green. Having his color charts in the book really helps :)
(Sorry for the photo glare...will get a better pic later.

5 comments:

splynch said...

Great picture Catherine. I love these flatiron buildings, there are examples on the West coast too, in Vancouver and Seattle. Is there one in SF, I can't remember? I love the greys, the terra rosa and cobalt is a great mix. And the buildings looming up behind the Gooderham building have a wonderful other-worldly quality.

Gwen Bell said...

This one pulls you right in! You know I love your textures and this one showcases it beautifully.

Kim said...

Really nice Catherine. And those trees offset everything so well. Beautiful.

Marie Theron said...

Once again, one of your always very accomplished paintings, Catherine! The brilliance of the cars and wet street with its reflections are all amazing. The central building works well in this composition with one side of the street quiet and the other busy. The receding buildings in the background forms a perfect setting for your focal point.

magicmyst said...

I love your portrayal of buildings. What struck me about this picture as usual is your amazing ability to capture rain and reflections. Interesting to see the brushstrokes on the painting. Kay